Thursday, August 28, 2008

Thursday theme: wheel

I don't know why, but the first time I saw the Thursday wheel theme on both ched's and kim's blogs I thought about Tibetan prayer wheels. I'm not a Buddhist, and I've frankly never seen a prayer wheel until looking at them online, and only vaguely realized they were even Tibetan, but I'm been drawn to them since this invitation to post about wheels.

There is a digital prayer wheel, but I'm not sure who is responsible; it is not enough I think to be merely intentional in thought.We need to send prayers circling, hugging, as well as aloft, as lighting a candle does for me usually. A lot for me to consider . . .

14 comments:

Squirrel said...

I thought of Saint Catherine's wheel at first, or a spinning wheel in a shop window in Nyack (Knitting Nation) but I didn't think of a Tibetan Prayer Wheel--I bet Kim did though!!!

mouse (aka kimy) said...

it's interesting to see what various religious traditions come up with to assist with the act of praying....

catholics and rosaries

buddhists with prayer wheels, prayer beads and my personal favorite prayer flags.

jews and prayer shawls and tefillin

muslin prayer rugs

definitely interesting....I wonder if anyone has done a dissertation on this.....

Betty C. said...

Thanks for your comment. Did you see Kucinich's (now I can't remember how to spell it) speech?

WAKE UP AMERICA!

Do you think it will happen?

lettuce said...

i thought of prayer wheels - and half expected to see one on kimy's blog.

i bet someone has done a dissertation on this

i find lighting candles really meaningful too - can be a prayer without words, or thoughts - or even without feelings... if that makes any sense.

Reya Mellicker said...

Prayer requires movement, apparently - moving beads on a string, davening, flapping in the wind and spinning around in a circle.

Prayer is not static. Amen!

The Liberator said...

lighting of candles--extremely pleasant! and incense and beads--it all flows together and puts you into a good space.

I'd like to get a prayer wheel.

Joanne said...

What beautiful prayer comments. I like the idea of prayer movement, circling, hugging and aloft, as though it has life. Very thoughtful. (Tut-tut, I commented earlier, but have a feeling it didn't go thru, so I'm resending) Have a nice weekend!

Squirrel said...

off subject:

Come to see Dan Zanes in Nyack in September!

Gary said...

And a lot for me to consider as well. I clicked on this link but it looks a bit too involved for me at the moment (how lame am I?).

Funny you should mention the intention of thought because I was just reading a book that stated "it is not the words that matter when praying it is the intention".

BTW, thank for visiting my blog and for your comments. I appreciate your feedback and insights.

Bob Dylan said...

tefillin is nice too for prayer.

Betty said...

I find prayer beads very helpful. I use Anglican ones, rather than the Catholic Rosary.
And candles, yes! Especially, as Lettuce said, when there are no words.
Thought-provoking post.

Steve said...

Prayer beads are used by Buddhists and Muslims, as well as Christians. We're all more alike than we are different, right?

citizen of the world said...

A wheel is such a universal symbol in religions - the whole circle of life idea.

dennis said...

Dennis likes beads and holy water.